Fatores de Risco

Risks Relating to Brazil

Brazilian economic and political conditions and perceptions of these conditions in the international market have a direct impact on our business and our access to international equity and debt markets, and could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition

Our operations are primarily conducted in Brazil, and we sell a material portion of our products to customers in Brazil. Accordingly, our financial condition and results of operations are substantially dependent on economic conditions in Brazil, and we cannot assure you that Brazilian gross domestic product, or GDP, will remain stable or grow in the future. Brazilian GDP, in real terms, decreased 3.6% in 2015, decreased 3.3% in 2016 and increased 1.1% and 1.1% in 2017 and 2018, respectively. Future developments in the Brazilian economy may affect Brazil’s growth rates and, consequently, the consumption of our products. As a result, these developments could impair our business strategies, results of operations and financial condition.

The Brazilian government frequently intervenes in the Brazilian economy and occasionally makes material changes in policy and regulations. The Brazilian government’s modifications to laws and regulations according to political, social and economic interests have often involved, among other measures, increases or decreases in interest rates, changes in fiscal and tax policies, wage and price controls, foreign exchange rate controls, blocking access to bank accounts, currency devaluations, capital controls and import restrictions. We have no control over and cannot predict the measures or policies that the Brazilian government may take in the future. Our business, results of operations and financial condition may be adversely affected by changes in government policies as well as general economic factors, including:

  • growth or downturn of the Brazilian economy;
  • depreciation of the real and other exchange rate fluctuations;
  • interest rates and monetary policies;
  • inflation rates;
  • economic, political and social instability;
  • labor and social security regulation;
  • energy and water shortages and rationing;
  • import and export controls;
  • exchange controls and restrictions on remittances abroad;
  • liquidity of the domestic capital and credit markets;
  • fiscal policies and changes in tax laws; and
  • other political, diplomatic, social and economic policies and developments in or affecting Brazil.

Inflation, and the Brazilian government’s measures to combat inflation, may significantly contribute to economic uncertainty in Brazil and may have material adverse effects on our business and results of operations

Brazil has historically experienced high rates of inflation. Inflation, as well as the Brazilian government’s efforts to combat inflation, have had significant negative effects on the Brazilian economy, particularly prior to the introduction of comprehensive currency reform (the Plano Real) in July 1994. In more recent years 2016, 2017 and 2018, rates reached 6.3%, 2.9% and is expected by the Central Bank (according to the Focus Report dated December 28, 2018) to be 3.69%, respectively, measured by the Extended National Consumer Price Index (Índice de Preços ao Consumidor Amplo), or IPCA, according to the IBGE.

Inflationary pressures continue to persist and the Brazilian government’s measures to combat them, as well as speculation about any such future measures, have generated over the last few years a climate of economic uncertainty in Brazil and heightened volatility the Brazilian capital markets. Brazil may experience high levels of inflation in the future.

As of March 31, 2019, 11.3% of our total loans and financing, including indebtedness outstanding and payables for the acquisition of businesses, were subject to varying rates of inflation IGP-M, IPCA and the Consumer Price Index (Índice de Preço ao Consumidor), or IPC. Increases in inflation could therefore adversely affect our financial expenses in the event of an unfavorable change in inflation. Additionally, inflationary pressures could lead to government intervention in the economy, including the introduction of policies that may adversely affect the overall performance of the Brazilian economy, which, in turn, could adversely affect the operations and the market value of the ADSs.

Developments and changes in the investors’ perception of risk in other countries, particularly in the United States, Europe and other emerging markets, may materially and adversely affect the market value of securities, including the market value of the ADSs

The market for securities issued by Brazilian companies is influenced by, to varying degrees, economic and market conditions in other countries, including the United States, Europe and other emerging markets. Although the economic conditions in these countries are significantly different from the economic condition in Brazil, the reaction of investors to developments in these countries may adversely affect the market value of securities issued by Brazilian companies. Crises in other emerging markets may reduce investor interest in shares from Brazilian issuers, including the ADSs. This could materially adversely affect the market price of the ADSs.

In addition, the financial crisis and political instability in the United States, Europe and other countries have affected the global economy, producing several effects that, directly or indirectly, impact the Brazilian capital market and economy, such as fluctuations in the price of securities issued by listed companies, reductions in credit supply, deterioration of the global economy, fluctuation in currency exchange rates and inflation, among others, which may, directly or indirectly, adversely affect us. In June 2016, the United Kingdom called a referendum in which a majority of its population voted for the United Kingdom to exit the European Union. We have no control over and cannot predict the effect of the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union nor over whether and the extent to which other member states will decide to exit the European Union in the future. On January 20, 2017, Donald Trump became the President of the United States. We have no control over and cannot predict the effect of Donald Trump’s administration or policies. These developments, as well as potential crises and forms of political instability arising therefrom or any other unforeseen development, may adversely affect us and the market value of the ADSs.

Political and economic instability in Brazil may adversely affect our business and results of operations

Brazil’s political environment has historically influenced, and continues to influence, the performance of the country’s economy. Political crises have affected and continue to affect investor confidence and that of the general public, which resulted in economic deceleration and heightened volatility in the securities issued by Brazilian companies.

The recent economic instability in Brazil has contributed to a reduction in market confidence in the Brazilian economy and to the aggravation of the situation of the domestic political environment. Furthermore, several ongoing investigations into accusations of money laundering and corruption being conducted by the Brazilian Federal Public Prosecutor’s Office, including the largest such investigation known as “Car Wash” (Lava Jato), have had a serious negative impact on the Brazilian economy and political landscape.

A number of senior politicians, including current and former members of Congress and the Executive Branch, and high-ranking executive officers of major corporations and state-owned companies in Brazil were arrested, convicted of various charges relating to corruption, entered into plea agreements with federal prosecutors and/or have resigned or been removed from their positions as a result of these Lava Jato investigations. These individuals are alleged to have accepted bribes by means of kickbacks on contracts granted by the government to several infrastructure, oil and gas and construction companies. The profits of these kickbacks allegedly financed the political campaigns of political parties forming the previous government’s coalition that was led by former President Dilma Rousseff, which funds were unaccounted for or not publicly disclosed. These funds were also allegedly destined toward the personal enrichment of certain individuals. The effects of Lava Jato as well as other ongoing corruption-related investigations resulted in an adverse impact on the image and reputation of those companies that have been implicated as well as on the general market perception of the Brazilian economy, political environment and the Brazilian capital markets. We have no control over, and cannot predict, whether such investigations or allegations will lead to further political and economic instability or whether new allegations against government officials will arise in the future.

Amidst this background of recent political uncertainty, in August 2016, the Brazilian Senate approved the removal from office of Brazil’s of then-President Dilma Rousseff, after completion of legal and administrative impeachment proceedings, on the grounds of violation of budgetary laws. Michel Temer, the former Vice President, who had been serving as acting president since Ms. Rousseff’s removal in May 2016 and assumed the presidency for the remainder of the presidential term, which ended in 2018. Throughout Mr. Temer’s presidency, his approval ratings remained historically low and he faced scrutiny over other matters, including allegations of bribery and other corrupt acts, which contributed to the uncertain political and economic environment in Brazil. After a polarized presidential campaign, Jair Bolsonaro, a former member of the military and three-decade congressman, was elected as the president of Brazil on October 28, 2018 and took office on January 1, 2019. We cannot predict if, and for how long, the political divisions in Brazil that emerged before the election will continue and impact his presidency. It is also not clear what effects, if any, such political division will have on the ability of President Bolsonaro to govern Brazil and implement reforms. Any continuation of such division could result in an impasse in Brazil’s Congress, political unrest and massive protests and/or strikes that could adversely affect our operations. Uncertainty regarding the implementation by the new government of related changes in monetary, fiscal and pension policies, as well as pertinent legislation, could contribute to economic instability. These uncertainties and new measures could increase the volatility of Brazilian securities markets, including in relation to our securities.

We cannot foresee whether President Bolsonaro will adopt policies or changes to current policies that may have a material adverse effect on us. Political and economic uncertainty resulting from the presidential elections or otherwise may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Uncertainty over whether the Brazilian government will implement changes in policy or regulation affecting these or other factors in the future may contribute to economic uncertainty in Brazil and to heightened volatility in the securities issued abroad by Brazilian companies. Historically, the political scenario in Brazil has influenced the performance of the Brazilian economy; in particular, political crises have affected the confidence of investors and the public in general, which adversely affected the economic development in Brazil.

We are subject to fluctuations in interest rates

The Central Bank establishes the basic interest rate for the Brazilian banking system. As of March 31, 2019, 91.4% of our total indebtedness, including outstanding loans and financing and payables for the acquisition of businesses (excluding present value adjustments relating to payables for the acquisition of businesses), were denominated in reais and subject to fluctuations in interest rates. The interest rate risk arises from the portion of our debt referenced to the Brazilian long term interest rate (taxa de juros de longo prazo), or TJLP, and Interbank Certificate of Deposit (Certificado de Depósito Interbancário), or CDI, which may adversely affect revenue or expenses in the event of an unfavorable change in interest rates and inflation. Any increase in interest rates could increase the cost of our borrowings, reduce demand for our products or have a materially adverse impact on our financial expenses and results of operations.

The volatility of the real against the U.S. dollar and other currencies may have a materially adverse effect on our business and the market price of the ADSs

Historically, Brazilian currency has suffered frequent devaluations. The Brazilian government has implemented various economic plans and utilized a number of exchange rate policies, including sudden devaluations, periodic mini-devaluations during which the frequency of adjustments has ranged from daily to monthly, a floating exchange rate, exchange controls and parallel market exchange rates. From time to time, there have been significant fluctuations in the exchange rate between the real, the U.S. dollar and other currencies. According to Central Bank data, at the end of years 2016, 2017 and 2018, the exchange rates between the real and the U.S. dollar were R$3.2591, R$3.3080 and R$3.8748, respectively. As of May 28, 2019, the exchange rate between the real and the U.S. dollar was R$4.0275 per US$1.00.

Uncertainty over whether the Brazilian government will implement changes in policy or regulation affecting these or other factors in the future may contribute to economic uncertainty in Brazil and to heightened volatility in the Brazilian securities markets and in the securities issued abroad by Brazilian issuers. Therefore, these uncertainties and developments in the Brazilian economy may adversely affect us and the market price of the ADSs.

Many of our customers are either foreign companies or multinational companies operating in Brazil and are exposed to exchange rate variations that could create an adverse effect on these companies. Additionally, the interest rate on our some of loans has been indexed to exchange rates. Any exchange rate fluctuations could therefore result in a materially adverse effect on our operations and financial results.

Depreciation of the real relative to the U.S. dollar could negatively affect the growth of the Brazilian economy as a whole and harm our financial condition and results of operations

Depreciations of the real relative to the U.S. dollar could create additional inflationary pressures in Brazil and cause increases in interest rates, which could negatively affect the growth of the Brazilian economy as a whole and harm our financial condition and results of operations. On the other hand, appreciation of the real relative to the U.S. dollar and other foreign currencies could lead to a deterioration of the Brazilian foreign exchange current accounts, as well as dampen export-driven growth. Depending on the circumstances, either depreciation or appreciation of the real could materially and adversely affect the growth of the Brazilian economy and us.

In addition, we believe that an increase in interest rates may cause an increase in financial expenses, negatively affecting our financial results. Similarly a reduction in interest rates may cause a decrease in financial income, which would also negatively affect our financial results.

Any further downgrading of Brazil’s credit rating could adversely affect the market price of the ADSs

Credit ratings affect investors’ perceptions of risk and, as a result, the yields required on future debt issuance in the capital markets. Rating agencies regularly evaluate Brazil and its sovereign ratings, which are based on a number of factors including macroeconomic trends, fiscal and budgetary conditions, indebtedness metrics and the perspective of changes in any of these factors. Brazil has lost its investment-grade sovereign debt credit rating by the three main U.S. based credit rating agencies, Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s and Fitch.

  • In September 2015, Standard & Poor’s lowered Brazil’s sovereign credit rating to below investment grade, from BBB– to BB+, citing, among other reasons, general instability in the Brazilian market caused by the Brazilian government’s interference in the economy and budgetary difficulties. Standard & Poor’s again downgraded Brazil’s credit rating in February 2016, from BB+ to BB, and maintained its negative outlook on the rating, citing a worsening credit situation since the September 2015 downgrade. In January 2018, Standard & Poor’s lowered its rating to BB– with a stable outlook in light of doubts regarding this year’s presidential election and pension reform efforts.
  • In December 2015, Moody’s placed Brazil’s Baa3 ratings on review, citing negative macroeconomic trends and a deterioration of the government’s fiscal conditions. Subsequently, in February 2016, Moody’s downgraded Brazil’s ratings to below investment grade, to Ba2 with a negative outlook, citing the prospect for further deterioration in Brazil’s debt service in a negative or low growth environment, in addition to challenging political dynamics. In April 2018, Moody’s maintained Brazil’s credit rating at Ba2 but revised outlook from negative to stable, which it maintained in September 2018, citing expectations of further cuts to government spending.
  • Fitch also downgraded Brazil’s credit rating to BB+ with a negative outlook in December 2015, citing the country’s rapidly expanding budget deficit and the worse-than-expected recession, and made a further downgrade in May 2016 to BB with a negative outlook, which it maintained in 2017 and downgraded to BB– in February 2018.

Any further downgrade of Brazil’s sovereign credit ratings could heighten investors’ perception of risk and, as a result, increase the future cost of debt issuance and adversely affect the market price of the ADSs.

Risks Relating to the ADSs, our common shares and the Offering

The volatility and illiquidity of the Brazilian securities market may substantially limit the ability of investors to sell the ADSs or our common shares at their preferred time and price

Prior to this offering, there has been no public market for the ADSs. Our common shares underlying the ADSs trade on the Novo Mercado segment of the B3. Although we have applied to have the ADSs listed on the NYSE, we cannot assure you that a liquid public market for the ADSs will develop.

The investment in securities trading in emerging markets such as Brazil (or in ADSs of companies with securities also trading in emerging markets) frequently involves a higher risk compared to other global markets, as investments in emerging markets are generally considered more speculative in nature. Risks associated with emerging markets may substantially limit the capacity of holders of our common shares or the ADSs to sell them at their preferred time and price.

With respect to our common shares, the Brazilian securities market is substantially smaller, less liquid, more concentrated and more volatile than some major international securities markets such as the United States and Europe. For example, as of December 31, 2018, the market capitalization of the B3 was approximately R$3.6 trillion (U.S.$929.1 billion at an exchange rate of U.S.$1.00 to R$3.8748), according to information published by the B3, and in 2018 it had an average daily trading volume of R$12.3 billion (U.S.$3.2 billion at an exchange rate of U.S.$1.00 to R$3.8748). Additionally, the Brazilian capital markets are significantly concentrated. The top ten stocks traded in terms of volume on the B3 accounted for approximately 46.0% of its total trading volume in 2018. In contrast, the market capitalization of the New York Stock Exchange was approximately U.S.$24.4 trillion as of December 31, 2018.

In addition, the NYSE has from time to time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that have affected the market prices for the securities of technology companies, particularly internet-related companies. As a result, investors in our securities may experience a decrease in the value of our common shares or the ADSs regardless of our operating performance or prospects. In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, shareholders have often instituted securities class actions against that company. If we are involved in a class-action lawsuit, it could divert the attention of our senior management and, if adversely determined, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Changes in Brazilian tax laws may have an adverse impact on the taxes applicable to a disposition of our common shares, including in the form of ADS

Law No. 10,833, dated as of December 29, 2003, provides that the disposition of assets located in Brazil by a non-resident to either a resident or a non-resident of Brazil is subject to taxation in Brazil, regardless of whether the disposition occurs outside or within Brazil. This provision results in the imposition of income tax on the gains arising from a disposition of our common shares by a non-resident of Brazil to either a resident or a non-resident of Brazil. However, since currently there is no judicial guidance determining whether the ADSs should be considered assets located in Brazil, we are unable to predict whether Brazilian courts may decide that income tax under Law No. 10,833 applies to gains realized on dispositions of the ADSs. In the event that the disposition of assets located in Brazil is interpreted to include the disposition of the ADSs, this tax law would result in the taxation of non-residents of Brazil on any gain or loss recognized on the disposition of ADSs. Any gain or loss recognized by a U.S. holder (as defined in “Taxation — Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations for U.S. Holders”) on the disposition of common shares, including in the form of ADSs, generally will be treated as U.S. source gain or loss for U.S. foreign tax credit purposes. Thus, a U.S. holder may not be able to benefit from a foreign tax credit for Brazilian income tax imposed on the disposition of common shares, including in the form of ADSs, unless the U.S. holder can apply the credit against U.S. federal income tax payable on other income from foreign sources. See “Taxation — Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations for U.S. Holders — Sale, Exchange or Other Disposition of Common Shares or the ADSs.”

The Brazilian government may impose exchange controls and significant restrictions on remittances of reais abroad, which would adversely affect your ability to convert and remit dividends or other distributions or the proceeds from the sale of our common shares our capacity to make dividend payments or other distributions to non-Brazilian investors and would reduce the market price of our common shares, including in the form of ADSs, and our capacity to comply with payment obligations in foreign currency

In case of serious imbalances, the Brazilian Government may restrict the remittance abroad of proceeds of investments in Brazil and the conversion of the real into foreign currencies. The Brazilian government last imposed such remittance restrictions for a brief period in 1989 and early 1990. We cannot assure you that the Brazilian government will not take similar measures in the future. The return of any such restrictions would hinder or prevent your ability to convert dividends or other distributions or the proceeds from any sale of our common shares into U.S. dollars and to remit U.S. dollars abroad, our capacity to make dividend payments or other distributions to non-Brazilian investors, and our capacity to comply with payment obligations in foreign currency. The imposition of any such restrictions would have a material adverse effect on the stock market price of our common shares, including in the form of ADSs, and on our capacity to access foreign capital markets.

If you surrender your ADSs and withdraw common shares, you risk losing the ability to remit foreign currency abroad and certain Brazilian tax advantages

As an ADS holder, you benefit from the electronic certificate of foreign capital registration obtained by the custodian for our common shares underlying the ADSs in Brazil, permitting the custodian to convert dividends and other distributions with respect to our common shares into non-Brazilian currency and remit the proceeds abroad. If you surrender your ADSs and withdraw common shares, you will be entitled to continue to rely on the custodian’s electronic certificate of foreign capital registration for only five business days from the date of withdrawal. There-after, upon the disposition of distributions relating to our common shares, unless you obtain your own electronic certificate of foreign capital registration, or you qualify under Brazilian foreign investment regulations that entitle certain foreign investors to buy and sell shares on Brazilian stock exchanges without obtaining separate electronic certificates of foreign capital registration, you would not be able to remit abroad non-Brazilian currency. In addition, if you do not qualify under the foreign investment regulations, you will generally be subject to less favorable tax treatment of dividends and distributions on, and the proceeds from any sale of, our common shares.

We may need to raise additional funds in the future and may issue additional common shares or convertible securities, which may result in a dilution of your interest in our common shares underlying the ADSs. In addition, a dilution of your interest in our common shares underlying the ADSs may occur in the event of our merger, consolidation or any other corporate transaction of similar effect in relation to companies that we may acquire in the future

We may have to raise additional funds in the future through private or public offerings of shares or other securities convertible into shares issued by us. The funds we raise through the public distribution of shares or securities converted into shares may be obtained with the exclusion of right of first refusal of our existing shareholders, including investors in our common shares underlying the ADSs, as provided by the Brazilian Corporate Law, which may dilute the interest of our then-existing investors. In addition, a dilution of your interest in our common shares underlying the ADSs may occur in the event of merger, consolidation or any other corporate transaction of similar effect in relation to companies that we may acquire in the future.

The voting rights of holders of ADSs are limited by the terms of the deposit agreement, and you may not be able to exercise your right to direct the vote of our common shares underlying the ADSs

Holders of ADSs do not have the same rights as our registered shareholders. As a holder of ADSs, you will not have any right to attend general meetings of our shareholders or to cast any votes at such meetings. You will only be able to exercise the voting rights with respect to the underlying common shares represented by your ADSs indirectly by giving voting instructions to the depositary in accordance with the provisions of the deposit agreement. Under the deposit agreement, you may vote only by giving voting instructions to the depositary. If we instruct the depositary to ask for your instructions, then upon receipt of your voting instructions, the depositary will try, as far as is practicable, to vote the underlying common shares that are represented by the ADSs, in accordance with your instructions. If we do not instruct the depositary to ask for your instructions, the depositary may still vote in accordance with instructions you give, but it is not required to do so. You will not be able to directly exercise your right to vote with respect to our underlying common shares represented by the ADSs unless you withdraw the shares and become the registered holder of such shares prior to the record date for the general meeting. We cannot guarantee that the process for the cancellation and exchange of the ADSs will be completed prior to the record date for the general meeting.

When a general meeting is convened, you may not receive sufficient advance notice of the meeting to withdraw our common shares underlying your ADSs and to vote directly with respect to any specific matter or resolution to be considered and voted upon at the general meeting.

If we ask for your instructions, the depositary will notify you of the upcoming vote and will arrange to deliver our voting materials to you. We have agreed to give the depositary no less than 15 days’ prior notice of shareholder meetings. Nevertheless, we cannot assure you that you will receive the voting materials in time to ensure that you can instruct the depositary to vote our underlying common shares represented by the ADSs. In addition, the depositary and its agents are not responsible for failing to carry out voting instructions or for their manner of carrying out your voting instructions. This means that you may not be able to exercise your right to direct how our common shares underlying the ADSs are voted and you may have no legal remedy if the common shares underlying the ADSs are not voted as you requested.

Your right to participate in any future offerings may be limited, which may result in the dilution of your interest in our capital stock

We may from time to time distribute rights to our shareholders, including rights to acquire our securities. However, we cannot make rights available to you in the United States unless we register both the rights and the securities to which the rights relate under the Securities Act or an exemption from the registration requirements is available. In particular, holders of our common shares, including our common shares underlying the ADSs benefit from certain preemptive rights in connection with future issuances by us of our common shares or securities convertible into our common shares. Holders of our common shares, including in the form of ADSs, will be unable to exercise the preemptive rights relating to our common shares unless a registration statement under the Securities Act is effective with respect to those preemptive rights or an exemption from registration requirement under the Securities Act is otherwise available.

In addition, under the deposit agreement, the depositary will not make rights available to you unless both the rights and the underlying securities to be distributed to ADS holders are either registered under the Securities Act or exempt from registration under the Securities Act. We are under no obligation to file a registration statement with respect to any such rights or securities or to endeavor to cause such a registration statement to be declared effective and we may not be able to establish a necessary exemption from registration under the Securities Act.

Accordingly, you may be unable to participate in our rights offerings or additional offerings of our common shares in the future and may experience dilution in your holdings.

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business, or publish negative reports about our business, the market price and trading volume of our common shares, including in the form of ADSs, could decline

The trading market for our common shares, including in the form of ADSs, depends in part on the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. If one or more of the analysts who cover us downgrade our stock or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our stock price would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease coverage of our company or fail to publish reports on us regularly, demand for our common shares, including in the form of ADSs, could decline, which might cause the market price and trading volume of our common shares, including in the form of ADSs to decline.

We and the depositary are entitled to amend the deposit agreement and to change the rights of ADS holders under the terms of such agreement, and we may terminate the deposit agreement, without the consent of the ADS holders

We and the depositary are entitled to amend the deposit agreement and to change the rights of the ADS holders under the terms of such agreement, without the consent of the ADS holders. We and the depositary may agree to amend the deposit agreement in any way we decide is necessary or advantageous to us. Amendments may reflect, among other things, operational changes in the ADS program, legal developments affecting ADSs or changes in the terms of our business relationship with the depositary. In the event that the terms of an amendment are disadvantageous to ADS holders, ADS holders will only receive 30 days’ advance notice of the amendment, and no consent of the ADS holders is required under the deposit agreement. Furthermore, we may decide to terminate the ADS facility at any time for any reason. For example, terminations may occur when we decide to list our shares on a non-U.S. securities exchange and determine not to continue to sponsor an ADS facility or when we become the subject of a takeover or a going-private transaction. If the ADS facility is to be terminated, ADS holders will receive at least 90 days’ prior notice, but no consent is required from them. In the event that we decide to make an amendment to the deposit agreement that is disadvantageous to ADS holders or terminate the deposit agreement, the ADS holders may choose to sell their ADSs or surrender their ADSs and become direct holders of our underlying common shares, but will have no right to any compensation whatsoever.

ADSs holders may not be entitled to a jury trial with respect to claims arising under the deposit agreement, which could result in less favorable outcomes to the plaintiff(s) in any such action

The deposit agreement governing the ADSs representing our common shares provides that, to the fullest extent permitted by law, ADS holders waive the right to a jury trial of any claim they may have against us or the depositary arising out of or relating to our common shares, the ADSs or the deposit agreement, including any claim under the U.S. federal securities laws. If we or the depositary opposed a jury trial demand based on the waiver, the court would determine whether the waiver was enforceable based on the facts and circumstances of that case in accordance with the applicable state and federal law. To our knowledge, the enforceability of a contractual pre-dispute jury trial waiver in connection with claims arising under the federal securities laws has not been finally adjudicated by the United States Supreme Court. However, we believe that a contractual pre-dispute jury trial waiver provision is generally enforceable, including under the laws of the State of New York, which govern the deposit agreement, by a federal or state court in the City of New York, which has non-exclusive jurisdiction over matters arising under the deposit agreement. In determining whether to enforce a contractual pre-dispute jury trial waiver provision, courts will generally consider whether a party knowingly, intelligently and voluntarily waived the right to a jury trial. We believe that this is the case with respect to the deposit agreement and the ADSs. It is advisable that you consult legal counsel regarding the jury waiver provision before entering into the deposit agreement.

If you or any other holders or beneficial owners of ADSs bring a claim against us or the depositary in connection with matters arising under the deposit agreement or the ADSs, including claims under federal securities laws, you or such other holder or beneficial owner may not be entitled to a jury trial with respect to such claims, which may have the effect of limiting and discouraging lawsuits against us and/or the depositary. If a lawsuit is brought against us and/or the depositary under the deposit agreement, it may be heard only by a judge or justice of the applicable trial court, which would be conducted according to different civil procedures and may result in different outcomes than a trial by jury would have had, including results that could be less favorable to the plaintiff(s) in any such action.

Nevertheless, if this jury trial waiver provision is not permitted by applicable law, an action could proceed under the terms of the deposit agreement with a jury trial. No condition, stipulation or provision of the deposit agreement or ADSs serves as a waiver by any holder or beneficial owner of ADSs or by us or the depositary of compliance with any substantive provision of the U.S. federal securities laws and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder.

Holders of ADSs may not receive any dividends or interest on equity

Our bylaws require us to pay our shareholders a mandatory dividend of at least 25.0% of our annual adjusted net income, as calculated under Brazilian GAAP and as adjusted according to Brazilian Corporate Law, distributed as dividends or interest on equity. Our net income may be capitalized, used to offset losses or retained under the terms of Brazilian Corporate Law and may not be fully available for the payment of dividends or interest on equity. In addition, Brazilian Corporate Law allows publicly-held companies, like us, to suspend the required minimum distribution of dividends. The payment of dividends may be suspended if our board of directors reports at a general shareholders’ meeting that such distribution would be incompatible with our financial condition. If the abovementioned occurs, holders of the ADSs underlying our common shares may not receive dividends or interest on equity.

To the extent we distribute dividends or interest on equity, the depositary has agreed to pay to you the cash dividends or other distributions it or the custodian receives on our common shares or other deposited securities after deducting its fees and expenses. You will receive these distributions in proportion to the number of common shares your ADSs represent. However, the depositary may, at its discretion, decide that it is inequitable or impractical to make a distribution available to any holders of ADSs. For example, the depositary may determine that it is not practicable to distribute certain property through the mail, or that the value of certain distributions may be less than the cost of mailing them. In such instances, the depositary may decide not to distribute such property to you.

We do not have a controlling shareholder or a control group that holds more than 50% of our common shares, which may leave us susceptible to shareholder alliances, conflicts among shareholders and other events arising from the absence of a controlling shareholder or a group of controlling shareholders that holds more than 50% of our common shares

We do not have a controlling shareholder or a control group that holds more than 50% of our common shares. As of the date of this prospectus, our founding shareholders jointly hold a minority interest of 16.46% of our capital stock. Accordingly, shareholder alliances may be formed or shareholders’ agreements may be entered into, which may result in the creation of a control group. In the event that a controlling group emerges and has decision-making power, we may suffer sudden and unexpected changes to our corporate policies and strategies, including the replacement of our executive officers. In addition, we may become more vulnerable to hostile attempts to acquire control and conflicts resulting therefrom.

The absence of a controlling group with more than 50% of our common shares, on the other hand, could make certain decision-making processes more difficult, as the minimum quorum required by law for certain deliberations may not be reached. In the absence of a control group, we and our minority shareholders may not have the same protection provided by the Brazilian Corporate Law against abuses by other shareholders and, thus, may face certain difficulties in seeking indemnification for damages arising therefrom.

Any sudden and unexpected changes to our management, corporate policies and strategies, hostile attempts to acquire control or any other dispute among our shareholders relating to their rights as shareholders may materially adversely affect us.

Our bylaws contain provisions for protection against a hostile takeover, which may prevent or delay transactions that may be of interest to you

Our bylaws contain provisions that make hostile takeover attempts difficult without prior negotiations with our controlling shareholders. One such provision requires a shareholder that becomes a holder of 25.0% or more of our capital stock to conduct a public offering to purchase all of our shares at a price calculated according to our bylaws, the Brazilian Corporate Law and applicable regulations. The same obligation exists when any person acquires certain rights over 30.0% or more of our capital stock. These provisions may prevent or delay takeover attempts and may discourage, delay or prevent takeover attempts that our controlling shareholders would deem inadvisable, including public tender offers for our common shares in which our shareholders would receive a premium.

Following completion of this offering, the same group of shareholders who exercise minority control over us will continue to exercise such control, and their interests may conflict with the interests of our other shareholders

The group of minority shareholders who effectively control us has the power to, among other matters, elect the majority of the members of our board of directors and determine the result of any decision that requires shareholder approval, provided there is no conflict of interest in relation to their voting rights, including with respect to related-party transactions, corporate restructuring, asset sales, partnerships and time of payment of any future dividends, subject to the mandatory minimum dividend required by the Brazilian Corporate Law. The group of minority shareholders who effectively control us may have conflicts of interest amongst themselves and/or with our other shareholders.

Common shares, including common shares underlying ADSs, eligible for future sale may cause the market price of the ADSs to decline significantly

The market price of the ADSs and our common shares underlying the ADSs may decline as a result of sales of a large number of ADSs or common shares in the market after this offering or the perception that these sales may occur. These sales, or the possibility that these sales may occur, also may make it more difficult for us to sell equity securities in the future at a time and at a price that we deem appropriate.

Following the completion of this offering, we will have outstanding common shares, including common shares underlying the ADSs, assuming the underwriters do not exercise their option to purchase additional ADSs. Subject to the lock-up agreements described below, the ADSs sold in this offering, including our common shares underlying the ADSs, will be freely tradable without restriction or further registration under the Securities Act by persons other than our affiliates within the meaning of Rule 144 of the Securities Act.

Our common shares underlying the ADSs trade on the Novo Mercado segment of the B3. A significant sell-off of our common shares on the B3 may materially adversely affect the market price of the ADSs. In addition, the perception in the public markets that sales by holders of our common shares might occur may also cause the market price of the ADSs to decline.

We have agreed with the underwriters, subject to certain exceptions, not to issue, offer, sell, contract to sell, pledge or otherwise dispose of, directly or indirectly, any of our common stock or ADSs or any securities convertible into or exchangeable or exercisable for any of our common stock and ADSs during the 90-day period after the date of this offering. Our directors and executive officers and certain relevant equity holders have agreed to substantially similar lock up provisions, subject to certain exceptions. However, the underwriters may, in their sole discretion and without notice, release all or any portion of the shares from the restrictions in any of the lock-up agreements described above. In addition, these lock-up agreements are subject to the exceptions described in “Common Shares Eligible for Future Sale,” including the right for our company to issue new shares if we carry out an acquisition or enter into a merger, joint venture or strategic participation.

Sales of a substantial number of our common shares, or the ADSs, upon expiration of the lock-up agreements, the perception that such sales may occur, or early release of these lock-up periods, could cause our market price to fall or make it more difficult for you to sell your ADSs at a time and price that you deem appropriate.

As our initial public offering price is substantially higher than our net tangible book value per share, you will experience immediate and substantial dilution

If you purchase ADSs in this offering, you will pay more for your ADSs than the amount paid by existing shareholders for our common shares on a per ADS basis. As a result, you will experience immediate and substantial dilution of approximately US$ per ADS (assuming no exercise of outstanding options to acquire common shares), representing the difference between our pro forma net tangible book value per ADS of US$ as of , 2019 after giving effect to this offering, and the assumed initial public offering price per share of US$ per ADS (the midpoint of the estimated initial public offering price range set forth on the front cover page of this prospectus). In addition, you may experience further dilution to the extent that our common shares are issued upon the exercise of share options. Substantially all of our common shares issuable upon the exercise of currently outstanding share options will be issued at a purchase price on a per ADS basis that is less than the initial public offering price per ADS in this offering. See “Dilution” for a more complete description of how the value of your investment in the ADSs will be diluted upon the completion of this offering.

Transformation into a public company in the United States may increase our costs and disrupt the regular operations of our business

This offering will have a significant transformative effect on us. Our business historically has operated as a publicly-held company in Brazil, and we expect to incur significant additional legal, accounting, reporting and other expenses as a result of having ADSs publicly-traded in the United States.

We also anticipate that we will incur costs associated with corporate governance requirements, including requirements under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, as well as rules implemented by the SEC and the NYSE. We expect these rules and regulations to increase our legal and financial compliance costs and make some management and corporate governance activities more time-consuming and costly, particularly after we are no longer an “emerging growth company.” These rules and regulations may make it more difficult and more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance, and we may be required to accept reduced policy limits and coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain the same or similar coverage. This could have an adverse impact on our ability to recruit and bring on a qualified independent board.

The additional demands associated with being a public company in the United States may disrupt regular operations of our business by diverting the attention of some of our senior management team away from revenue producing activities to management and administrative oversight, adversely affecting our ability to attract and complete business opportunities and increasing the difficulty in both retaining professionals and managing and growing our businesses. Any of these effects could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We have broad discretion in the use of the net proceeds from this offering and may not use them effectively

Our management will have broad discretion in the application of the net proceeds from this offering and could spend the proceeds in ways that do not improve our results of operations or enhance the value of the ADSs and our underlying common shares. The failure by our management to apply these funds effectively could result in financial losses that could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. Pending their use, we may invest the net proceeds from this offering in a manner that does not produce income or that loses value. See “Use of Proceeds.”

As a foreign private issuer and an “emerging growth company” (as defined in the JOBS Act), we will have different disclosure and other requirements than U.S. domestic registrants and non-emerging growth companies

As a foreign private issuer and emerging growth company, we may be subject to different disclosure and other requirements than domestic U.S. registrants and non-emerging growth companies. For example, as a foreign private issuer in the United States, we are not subject to the same disclosure requirements as a domestic U.S. registrant under the Exchange Act, including the requirements to prepare and issue quarterly reports on Form 10-Q or to file current reports on Form 8-K upon the occurrence of specified significant events, the proxy rules applicable to domestic U.S. registrants under Section 14 of the Exchange Act or the insider reporting and short-swing profit rules applicable to domestic U.S. registrants under Section 16 of the Exchange Act. In addition, we intend to rely on exemptions from certain U.S. rules which will permit us to follow Brazilian legal requirements rather than certain of the requirements that are applicable to U.S. domestic registrants.

Furthermore, foreign private issuers are required to file their annual report on Form 20-F within 120 days after the end of each fiscal year, while U.S. domestic issuers that are accelerated filers are required to file their annual report on Form 10-K within 75 days after the end of each fiscal year. Foreign private issuers are also exempt from Regulation Fair Disclosure, aimed at preventing issuers from making selective disclosures of material information, although we will be subject to Brazilian laws and regulations having substantially the same effect as Regulation Fair Disclosure. As a result of the above, even though we are required to file reports on Form 6-K disclosing the limited information which we have made or are required to make public pursuant to Brazilian law, or are required to distribute to shareholders generally, and that is material to us, you may not receive information of the same type or amount that is required to be disclosed to shareholders of a U.S. company.

The JOBS Act contains provisions that, among other things, relax certain reporting requirements for emerging growth companies. Under this act, as an emerging growth company, we will not be subject to the same disclosure and financial reporting requirements as non-emerging growth companies. For example, as an emerging growth company we are permitted to, and intend to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies. Also, we will not have to comply with future audit rules promulgated by the U.S. Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or PCAOB, (unless the SEC determines otherwise) and our auditors will not need to attest to our internal controls under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. We may follow these reporting exemptions until we are no longer an emerging growth company. As a result, our shareholders may not have access to certain information that they deem important. We will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier of (1) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the completion of this offering, (b) in which we have total annual revenue of at least US$1.07 billion, or (c) in which we are deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which means the market value of our common shares, including common shares underlying the ADSs, held by non-affiliates exceeds US$700.0 million as of the prior June 30, and (2) the date on which we have issued more than US$1.0 billion in non-convertible debt during the prior three-year period. Accordingly, the information about us available to you will not be the same as, and may be more limited than, the information available to shareholders of a non-emerging growth company.

We could be an “emerging growth company” for up to five years, although circumstances could cause us to lose that status earlier, including if the market value of our common shares, including common shares underlying the ADSs, held by non-affiliates exceeds US$700 million as of any June 30 (the end of our second fiscal quarter) before that time, in which case we would no longer be an “emerging growth company” as of the following December 31 (our fiscal year end). We cannot predict if investors will find the ADSs less attractive because we may rely on these exemptions. If some investors find the ADSs less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for the ADSs and the price of the ADSs and our common shares may be more volatile.

We are a foreign private issuer and, as a result, in accordance with the listing requirements of the NYSE we rely on certain home country governance practices from Brazil, rather than the corporate governance requirements of the NYSE

We report under the Exchange Act as a non-U.S. company with foreign private issuer status. The NYSE rules provide that foreign private issuers are permitted to follow home country practice in lieu of certain NYSE corporate governance standards. The standards applicable to us are considerably different than the standards applied to U.S. domestic issuers. For instance, we are not required to:

  • have a majority of independent members on our board of directors (other than as may result from the requirements for audit committee member independence under the Exchange Act);
  • have a minimum of three members on our audit committee;
  • have a compensation committee or a nominating and corporate governance committee;
  • have regularly scheduled executive sessions of our board that consist of independent directors only; or
  • adopt and disclose a code of business conduct and ethics for directors, officers and employees.

As a foreign private issuer, we may follow our home country practice in Brazil in lieu of the above requirements. Therefore, the approach to governance adopted by our board of directors may be different from that of a board of directors consisting of a majority of independent directors, and, as a result, our management oversight may be more limited than if we were subject to all of the NYSE corporate governance standards. Accordingly, you may not have the same protections afforded to shareholders of companies that are not foreign private issuers. See “Description of Capital Stock — Principal Differences between Brazilian and U.S. Corporate Governance Practices.”

We may lose our foreign private issuer status which would then require us to comply with the Exchange Act’s domestic reporting regime and cause us to incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses

In order to maintain our current status as a foreign private issuer, either (a) more than 50% of our common shares, including common shares underlying the ADSs, must be either directly or indirectly owned of record by non-residents of the United States or (b) (i) a majority of our executive officers or directors must not be U.S. citizens or residents, (ii) more than 50% of our assets cannot be located in the United States and (iii) our business must be administered principally outside the United States. If we lose this status, we would be required to comply with the Exchange Act reporting and other requirements applicable to U.S. domestic issuers, which are more detailed and extensive than the requirements for foreign private issuers. We may also be required to make changes in our corporate governance practices in accordance with various SEC and NYSE rules. The regulatory and compliance costs to us under U.S. securities laws if we are required to comply with the reporting requirements applicable to a U.S. domestic issuer may be significantly higher than the costs we will incur as a foreign private issuer.

Total return swap and hedge transactions may influence the demand and the price of our common shares

The underwriters or their respective affiliates may subscribe for our common shares underlying the ADSs in order to hedge transactions involving our common shares. These transactions may influence the demand and the price per ADS and reduce liquidity of our common shares, including the common shares underlying the ADSs, in the secondary market.

The protections afforded to minority shareholders in Brazil are different from those in the United States and may be more difficult to enforce

Under Brazilian law, the protections afforded to minority shareholders are different from those in the United States. In particular, the legal framework and case law pertaining to disputes between shareholders and us, our directors and officers or our shareholders is less developed in Brazil than it is in the United States and there are different procedural requirements for bringing shareholder lawsuits, such as shareholder derivative suits, which differ from those you may be familiar with under U.S. or other laws. There is also a substantially less active plaintiffs’ bar for the enforcement of shareholders’ rights in Brazil than there is in the United States. As a result, in practice it may be more difficult for our minority shareholders to enforce their rights against us or our directors or officers or shareholders than it would for shareholders of a U.S. domestic issuer.

Investors may experience difficulty in effecting service of process or enforcing judgments on us, our directors and/or our officers within the United States in connection with this offering

We are a corporation (sociedade anônima) incorporated under the laws of Brazil. All of our directors and officers reside outside the United States and a majority of our assets are located outside the United States. As a result, it may not be possible or it may be difficult for investors to effect service of process upon us or these other persons within the United States or to enforce judgments obtained in United States courts against us, our directors or our officers, including those predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the federal securities laws of the United States. Also, because judgments of U.S. courts for civil liabilities based upon the U.S. federal securities laws may only be enforced in Brazil if certain conditions are met, you may face greater difficulties in protecting your interests in the case of actions against us or our board of directors or executive officers than would shareholders of a U.S. corporation. See “Enforcement of Judgments and Service of Process.”

We may be a passive foreign investment company for U.S. federal income tax purposes in any year, which could result in adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences to U.S. holders

In general, if for any taxable year 75% or more of our gross income consists of passive income or 50% or more of the average quarterly value of our assets consists of assets that produce, or are held for the production of, passive income, we would be characterized as a passive foreign investment company, or PFIC, for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Passive income generally includes dividends, interest, rents, royalties and gains from the disposition of investment assets, subject to various exceptions. Based upon the current and anticipated composition of our gross income and gross assets, the market value of our assets and the nature of our business, we do not believe that we were treated as a PFIC for the taxable year ending on December 31, 2018 or will be treated as a PFIC in 2019 or in the foreseeable future. However, a company’s PFIC status is a factual determination that is made on an annual basis and depends on the composition of a company’s income and assets and the market value of its assets from time to time. If we are a PFIC for any taxable year during which a U.S. holder (as defined in “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations for U.S. Holders”) owned our common shares or ADSs, such U.S. holder may be subject to certain adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences, including increased tax liability on gains from dispositions of our common shares or ADSs and certain distributions and a requirement to file annual reports with the Internal Revenue Service. See “Taxation — Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations for U.S. Holders — Passive Foreign Investment Company Rules” for more information. Potential U.S. holders are urged to consult their tax advisors with respect to whether we may be treated as a PFIC and the tax consequences if we are so treated.

Risks Relating to Our Industry and Us

We are substantially dependent on revenue generated from services related to our integrated enterprise management software, including monthly subscription fees

Our revenue is substantially dependent on our integrated enterprise retail management software licensing and ongoing services related to them. The significant majority of our revenue is derived from the monthly subscription fees for the use of our software, which comprise almost all of our gross operating revenue (89.1%, 86.8%, 89.8% and 89.6% for the three-month period ended March 31, 2019, and for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively). As a result, a reduction in revenue from this source, whether due to increased competition, adverse market conditions or a general reduction in demand for integrated enterprise management software and services or other factors, could materially adversely affect our operational results, cash flows and liquidity.

The software industry is highly competitive and we may be unable to compete effectively

We compete in markets characterized by vigorous competition, changing technology, changing client and end-consumer needs, evolving industry standards and frequent introductions of new products and services. We compete with several companies that operate in the global, regional and local software industries, including providers of integrated enterprise management software, developers of free software, payment processing and companies providing consulting services and outsourcing. Some of our current or potential competitors may be engaged in a greater range of businesses, have a larger installed base of customers for their existing products and services or have greater financial, technical, sales or other resources than us. We expect competition to intensify in the future as traditional, non-traditional and new competitors introduce new services or enhance existing services. We may lose market share if our competitors introduce or acquire new products that compete with our software and related services or add new features to their products or if new entrants emerge in the market. Any of these events could cause a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operation or cash flows.

Our success depends on our ability to develop new products and services, integrate acquired products and services, improve our existing products and services and keep up with technological developments

The market in which we operate is characterized by constant technological advances, changing hardware requirements, rapid development in software and communications infrastructure, increasingly complex customer requirements and frequent introductions of new products and improvements of existing products. If we fail to improve our products and services to accommodate such technological evolution, as well as any corresponding legislative changes, including changes to tax legislation, in a timely manner or to position and price our products and services to meet market demand, our customers may stop purchasing new software licenses and services from us and we may lose our ability to attract and retain customers.

In addition, internet and network protocols and other industry standards are subject to rapid change and we cannot guarantee that the industry standards that we adopt in developing new products will enable us to compete effectively for new business opportunities in the markets in which we operate. Any of these events could materially adversely affect our revenue and cash generation.

We may experience difficulties in achieving our acquisition strategy

We have acquired, and may from time to time acquire, businesses, products, services and technologies. The success of an acquisition or investment will depend on our ability to make accurate assumptions regarding the valuation, operations, growth potential, integration and other factors related to that business. Our acquisitions or investments may not produce the results that we expect at the time we enter into or complete a given transaction. The risks that we may face in connection with these acquisitions include the following:

  • we may experience a disruption in our existing business and our management’s attention may be diverted to matters relating to the acquisitions, transitions or integration;
  • we may experience difficulties in integrating the acquired company’s human resources or other administrative systems;
  • we may lose key personnel of the acquired company;
  • we may suffer a deterioration in our existing business or the acquired company’s relationships with customers, partners or suppliers of technology and outsourced products;
  • an acquisition may not promote our business strategy as we expected, we may not be successful in integrating an acquired business or technology as successfully as expected, such integration may require spending more resources or we may not receive the expected return on our investments;
  • we may encounter difficulties related to the management of technologies of the acquired company or its business lines or our entry into new markets where we have limited or no direct experience or where competitors may have stronger market positions;
  • we may not realize the anticipated revenue increase from an acquisition for various reasons, such as a large number of customers declining to renew software license updates and product support contracts, our inability to sell the acquired products to our customer base or contracts of an acquired company not permitting timely revenue recognition;
  • we may have difficulty incorporating acquired technologies or products with our existing product lines, as well as maintaining uniform standards, architecture, controls, procedures and policies;
  • as a result of our acquisitions, we may have multiple product lines that are offered, priced and supported in different ways, which could cause confusion among consumers and delays in supply or delivery and result in product discontinuity and a reduction in sales;
  • we may have cost overruns resulting from the continued support and development of acquired products, from general and administrative functions that support new business models or from associated regulations that prove to be more complicated than originally expected;
  • we may not receive expected approvals in a timely manner or may be subject to restrictions or other penalties imposed by unions or similar entities under applicable labor laws as a result of acquisitions, which could adversely affect our integration plans in certain jurisdictions;
  • the use of cash to finance acquisitions could limit other potential expenses, including share repurchases and dividend payments;
  • we may be subject to litigation, administrative or arbitral liabilities related to the acquired companies, and we may be obligated to pay sums for which we do not have a right to indemnification by the sellers of the respective acquired companies or for which we may be unable to receive, in whole or in part, indemnification from the sellers of the respective acquired companies; and
  • we may be subject to questioning from tax authorities regarding the registration and amortization of goodwill for tax purposes.

We may spend time and capital on acquisitions that do not increase our revenue. To the extent we pay the purchase price of any acquisition in cash, any such purchase would reduce our cash reserves, and to the extent the purchase price is paid with any of our shares, could be dilutive to our shareholders. To the extent we pay the purchase price with proceeds from the incurrence of debt, any such purchase would increase our level of indebtedness and could negatively affect our liquidity, restrict our operations and materially adversely affect our results of operations. Our competitors may be willing or able to pay more than us for acquisitions, which may cause us to be unable to take advantage of certain acquisition opportunities.

The occurrence of any of these events could materially adversely affect our business, operational results, financial condition or cash flow, especially with respect to a large acquisition or several concurrent acquisitions.

We are subject to risks and liability relating to system failures, the non-authorized or incorrect use of third-party data used by and/or made available to our systems

Our systems may receive third-party data. Our efforts to protect such data used by and/or made available to our systems may be insufficient and may not ensure that we are in compliance with applicable rules and regulations related to the collection, treatment and use of users’ data. Any non-compliance with applicable laws may subject us to penalties, such as fines, particularly in relation to (1) the express consent of users for the collection and treatment of their data, (2) the term provided by law for storing and excluding users’ data and (3) the adoption of the required security standards for the conservation and protection of the collected and stored data. Accordingly, the incorrect use of third-party data in our systems and/or the lack of measures to protect such data may (1) result in significant costs to us and the reallocation of our resources and (2) divert the attention of our management and technology team, which may adversely affect our business, competitive position, financial situation, results of operations and cash flows.

Additionally, we retain billing data, intellectual property, personally identifiable information and other sensitive information from our customers on our networks. Our infrastructure and the third-party infrastructure we use to host our solutions may be vulnerable to hacker attacks or other problems, which may overcome the security measures we adopt. In particular, our cloud infrastructure may be vulnerable to security breaches, computer viruses or similar problems, and these systems are also subject to telecommunications failures, power loss and other system failures. Unimpeded access to the cloud servers is fundamental to the provision of services to our SaaS customers. Any of these occurrences, whether intentional or accidental, could lead to interruptions, delays or suspension of our SaaS data center operations and may compromise the information stored on our networks. Such an occurrence could materially adversely affect our reputation as a reliable supplier and host of such solutions and negatively affect the market perception of the safety or reliability of our products or services and, as to SaaS, may cause some of our customers to cancel their subscriptions to our cloud applications and subject us to indemnification payments.

Sales to our customers are made through systems that we have developed, and in the case of our cloud-based solutions, stored on our servers. Any interruption in the operation of these systems may result in a loss of sales from our customers. Furthermore, any error in billing or in issuing the invoice or accounting products sold by our customers could result in substantial losses to them, which could materially adversely affect our results of operations, financial condition and our reputation.

A failure to adequately protect personal data may materially adversely affect us

We manage and maintain the personal data of our customers, employees and suppliers in the normal course of our business. Unauthorized disclosures or security breaches may subject us to legal action and penalties that may materially adversely us. In addition, in the course of our business activities, we are exposed to possible risks of noncompliance with policies, improper conduct of our employees or negligence and fraud, which may result in serious reputational or financial damage.

Currently, the processing of personal data in Brazil is regulated by a diverse and complex body of legislation. Our efforts to protect personal data that we process may not guarantee the adequate protection of such data or compliance with the personal data protection rules established under the current legislative regime.

The Brazilian General Data Protection Act (Federal Law 13,790/2018) was published in the Federal Official Gazette on August 15, 2018 and was amended by Provisional Measure No. 869, issued by the President of Brazil in December 2018, or the MP 869/2018. As amended by the MP 869/2018, the Brazilian General Data Protection Act will take effect in August 2020. This legislation is expected to transform the current legislative regime applicable to personal data protection in Brazil. The Brazilian General Data Protection Act establishes a new legal framework for the processing of personal data and provides for the rights of holders of personal data, legal standards applicable to the protection of personal data, requirements for obtaining consent, obligations and requirements related to security incidents, data leaks and data transfers, as well as the creation of a national data protection authority. We may face difficulties in complying with the Brazilian General Data Protection Act due to the quantity and complexity of the new obligations it will introduce. In the event of non-compliance with the General Data Protection Law, we may be subject to penalties including warnings, the requirement to remove personal data from our system and fines of up to two percent of our economic group’s total most-recently reported annual net revenue and up to a maximum of R$50.0 million per infraction.

The absence of sufficient measures to protect the personal data processed by us, or our inability to comply with applicable legislation, may materially adversely affect us

We depend on suppliers of telecommunications, internet and data centers for our “software-as-a-service,” or SaaS, cloud and on-premise infrastructure, and any fluctuation or interruption in the provision of these services may materially adversely affect our abilities to serve our customers and profitability

Providers of telecommunications, internet and data centers are a fundamental part of our infrastructure of SaaS, cloud and on-premise software and services. We depend on them to provide such services and they constitute a key element in our business strategy and infrastructure. It is crucial that the infrastructure that we use to host our software products remains safe, does not suffer system failures and is perceived by our customers and partners to be safe and reliable. Instability or interruptions of our services due to failures by our suppliers are usually perceived by our customers as our responsibility and may adversely affect the market’s perception of the quality of our products or services, including with respect to SaaS, cloud and on-premise software and services, which may cause some of our customers to cancel their subscriptions to our services and affect our ability to increase our sales.

Our investments in research and development may not result in increased revenue

The investment in the development of software products through research-driven product development and expansion of our knowledge base is costly and may not provide financial returns. Additionally, products with accelerated releases or with short life cycles require high levels of spending on research and development. We believe that we must continue to dedicate a significant amount of resources for research and development to maintain our competitive position. Our investments in research and development may not prove efficient and may not result in increased revenue or growth and, consequently, our financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected. For additional information regarding our investments in research and development, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Capital Expenditures.”

Our growth depends on the continued contributions of certain key members of senior management and our ability to continue to attract and retain qualified personnel

Our performance depends on the efforts and capabilities of certain key members of senior management who are responsible for making most of the critical decisions that guide our business, particularly regarding the implementation of our strategies and development of our operations. If we lose any of these executives, for any reason, we may have problems in defining and executing our business strategy and our financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

In addition, if any key members of our senior management leave our company for any reason, we may incur significant costs to attract new highly qualified professionals as replacements. There is significant competition in the global market for qualified personnel in the commercial, technical and other areas. Consequently, we may be required to pay higher compensation in order to attract and maintain qualified personnel, which may adversely affect our operating and financial results.

We are subject to partial or total failures or interruptions in our services and software related to IT infrastructure, which is highly complex

We require a highly complex technology infrastructure for our operations and depend on the efficient and uninterrupted operation of numerous systems, including our computer systems, software, data centers and telecommunications networks, as well as the systems of third parties. We are subject to partial or total failures or interruptions in our services and software that could give rise to loss of revenue, loss of customers, possible actions for damages from our customers, additional operating and development costs and diversion of technical and other resources, among others, adversely affecting our reputation among our customers and the markets in which we operate. In addition, depending on the degree of the damage caused, we may be subject to regulatory penalties, such as the loss of certain approvals to operate our software.

We may be subject to errors, delays or failures of security of our products and services

Our software may contain errors or security flaws, especially at the launch of new products or release of new versions of existing products. The errors in our software may affect the ability of our products to work with other hardware or software, as well as delay the development or release of new products or new versions or undermine the reputation of our products in the market. Our systems and operations could suffer damage or interruption from natural disasters, acts of terrorism, power shortages, telecommunications failure, cyberattacks, sabotage, unauthorized entry, computer viruses and physical or electronic break-ins and similar disruptions from unauthorized tampering with our computer systems and data centers, among others. If we experience errors or delays in the launch of new products or new versions of our existing products, we may lose customers or incur opportunity costs, which may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, cash flows and operational results.

Additionally, errors and security flaws in our software products may expose us to liability for product performance complaints and warranty claims, as well as damage to our reputation, which could impact future sales of our products and services. Moreover, addressing problems and complaints associated with actual or alleged errors or security flaws may require a significant amount of time and attention from our management team, resulting in high costs, which may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and operational results.

As a holding company, we are dependent on dividends and other distributions from our subsidiaries, which we may not receive

As a holding company, our ability to comply with financial obligations and to pay dividends or other distributions to our shareholders and holders of the ADSs in the future will depend on our cash flows and our subsidiaries’ results of operations, as well as the distribution of such results of operations to us in the form of dividends or interest on equity. The amount of any dividends or distributions which may be paid to us from time to time will depend on many factors including, for example: such subsidiaries results of operations and financial condition; limits on dividends under applicable law; its constitutional documents; documents governing any indebtedness; applicability of tax treaties; and other factors which may be outside our control. There is no guarantee that such resources will be actually available to us or sufficient for us to comply with our financial obligations and to pay dividends or other distributions to our shareholders and holders of the ADSs.

If we are unable to properly manage our growth, our results may be adversely affected

We may fail to correctly estimate, qualitatively or quantitatively, the costs and risks associated with our expansion, and can offer no assurance that our systems, procedures, business processes and management controls are sufficient to support the expected rapid expansion of our operations, including expansion to new markets and verticals. We cannot assure you that our current and planned systems, procedures and controls, personnel and third-party relationships will be adequate to support our future operations. In addition, we have entered and may enter into new lines of business that may involve complexities associated with the new products, services and regulations, which could place a strain on our management and operational and financial resources in the future. If we fail to successfully manage growth, our results of operations may be adversely affected.

Certain of our financing agreements contain cross-default clauses

Some of our financing agreements contain cross-default clauses or cross-acceleration clauses. Accordingly, the occurrence of an event of default under one of the contracts governing our outstanding debt could trigger an event of default on other debt or allow the creditors of our other debt to accelerate repayment to become immediately due and payable, which could materially adversely affect the results of our operations, cash availability and the price of our shares.

Additionally, we have entered into credit facilities in which the Brazilian National Economic and Social Development Bank (Banco Nacional de Desenvolvimento Econômico e Social), or BNDES, imposed several restrictions on us, including the need for prior approval from BNDES for: (1) our or our subsidiaries’ direct lending to individuals or entities which may or may not have shared corporate interests with us; (2) borrowing from individuals or entities which have shared corporate interests with us; (3) providing guarantees of any kind in operations with other creditors, in the event the guarantees have not also been provided to BNDES under the same conditions and having the same priority and (4) making investments in companies in Brazil or abroad. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Indebtedness.”

Losses not covered by our insurance policies may have a material adverse effect on us

We are subject to risks for which we do not have adequate or any insurance coverage, including risks not managed by our backup systems and contingency plans. For instance, we have not obtained insurance to protect against cybersecurity risks. Furthermore, the quantification of risk exposure in existing clauses in our insurance policies may be inadequate or insufficient, and may lead to a lower-than-expected insurance repayment. In addition, our insurance policy coverage is conditional on the payment of premiums under such policies. Our failure to pay these premiums together with the occurrence of a claim may put us at risk, as the relevant insurer would not be liable to cover us for any losses we incurred. We cannot assure you that we will be able to maintain our insurance policies in the future or that we will be able to renew them at reasonable prices or on acceptable terms. Thus, if certain damaging events occur and we are not adequately insured against them, they may, individually or together, adversely affect our results of operations and require us to commit significant cash resources to cover such losses. See “Business — Insurance.”

We are subject to unfavorable results in judicial or administrative proceedings that may adversely affect our results and financial condition

We are a party to certain legal and administrative proceedings. Unfavorable decisions in these proceedings may adversely affect our results and financial condition in the event our resulting liability exceeds any amounts we have provisioned or guarantees we have deposited in respect of these proceedings. See “Business — Legal and Administrative Proceedings.”

Any significant interruption in our cloud-based platform could materially adversely affect our business and harm our reputation, forcing us to provide credits or refunds and may cause customers to terminate their contracts with us prior to their stated maturity, which may adversely affect us

Our cloud-based platform is a critical part of our business operations. Any significant interruption in our services, products and/or infrastructure may give rise to claims by our customers, which may negatively affect the results of our operations and our financial condition, as well as our reputation with our customers.

We may suffer losses due to defaults by our customers

A default by one or more of our subscribed customers or by one or more groups of customers, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operation, financial condition and cash flows.

Potential interruptions in payment by customers could be caused by a customer’s financial difficulties including bankruptcy, among other factors. In addition, a failure on our part to properly analyze the credit or financial condition of these customers may result in the failure to properly identify and make provisions for default by customers.

Substantially all of our revenues are derived from customers concentrated in the retail sector, which is sensitive to unfavorable economic cycles and decreases in the purchasing power of consumers

Our activities are exclusively focused on the retail sector and substantially all of our revenues are derived therefrom. Historically, the Brazilian retail sector has been prone to periods of economic downturn resulting in an overall decline in consumer spending. The success of retail sector operations depends on several factors relating to consumer spending, including the general business climate at the time, interest rates, inflation, the availability of consumer credit, taxation, consumer confidence in future economic conditions, levels of employment and wages. Unfavorable conditions in the Brazilian economy can therefore significantly reduce consumer spending, which could materially adversely affect our sales, results of operations and financial condition.

We may experience unfavorable conditions in our industry or the global economy that result in reductions in spending on IT that could limit our ability to grow and develop our business, thereby adversely affecting our results of operations

Our results of operations may vary according to the impact of changes in our industry or global economy on us or our customers. Increases in revenue and profitability of our business depend on demand for our software and related services.

In light of the fact that we are a service provider, part of our revenue results from the number of new users of our software, which in turn is influenced by general employment levels. Insofar as unfavorable economic conditions cause our customers and potential customers to merely maintain or even reduce their demand for our services, our revenue may be adversely affected. Historically, economic downturns have resulted in overall reductions in IT spending, as well as pressure for longer billing cycles, as occurred during the recession of 2016. If economic conditions deteriorate or do not improve significantly, our customers and potential customers may choose to reduce their IT solutions, which would limit our ability to expand our business and could materially adversely affect our results of operations.

Our business and results of operations could be harmed if we are unable to protect and enforce our intellectual property rights

Measures we have taken to protect our intellectual property may be inadequate to prevent misappropriation, resulting in the misuse of our products and forcing us to protect our intellectual property through legal or administrative proceedings. The misuse of our products or the measures we are required to take to protect our intellectual property rights could result in substantial costs to us and divert the resources and attention of our management and technical team, which could materially adversely affect our business, competitive position, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We are subject to the risk of lawsuits involving alleged violations of intellectual property rights of third parties, due in part to the recent increase in the number of patents and copyrights by technology companies

We may be required to change, in whole or in part, certain of our products that have allegedly infringed upon the intellectual property rights of third parties and may be required to pay significant amounts of penalties, royalties or licensing fees for the use of others’ patents or copyrighted materials. Any changes to our products or to revenue attributable to any of our products that are in violation of others’ intellectual property rights may materially adversely affect our results of operations, reputation and the demand for our products. In addition, such changes may require attention from our management, cause us to incur additional legal expenses, or in some cases, require us to create reserves, all of which may materially adversely affect us.

We benefit from Brazilian government tax incentive programs, which may be terminated or reduced in the future

We benefit from certain tax incentives related to research and development and technological innovation, established by Law No. 11,196, dated November 21, 2005, as amended, or Lei do Bem, and regulated by Decree No. 5,798, dated June 7, 2006. Our ability to benefit from these incentives depends on our compliance with certain obligations.

Failure on our part to comply with certain obligations in accordance with the applicable rules or to provide the documentation required to substantiate such tax credits could result in the loss of such incentives that have not yet been used and claims by the Brazilian tax authorities of the amount corresponding to taxes not paid as a result of the incentives already used, in addition to penalties and interest under Brazilian tax laws. If any of our tax benefits expires, terminates or is cancelled, we may not be successful in obtaining new tax benefits that are equally favorable, which may materially adversely affect us. For more information, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation — Description of Principal Statement of Income Line Items — Current and Deferred Income Tax and Social Contribution.”

Our business automation software and electronic invoice (Nota Fiscal Electronica), or NFE, services are provided pursuant to approvals by the Brazilian Internal Revenue Service (Secretaria da Fazenda), or Sefaz, of each Brazilian state

We offer business automation software and the use of NFEs and electronic tax receipts (Nota Fiscal Consumidor Electronica), or NFCEs, customized to meet the requirements of the tax laws of different Brazilian states. Such business automation solutions must be approved by the tax authorities of each Brazilian state to certify regulatory adherence. If we do not receive or are at any point denied any of these approvals, we will be prevented from continuing our business automation software and NFEs and NFCEs activities in the state where approval has been denied, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial results.

We or our directors could be accused of facilitating tax evasion by our customers in which case we could be held responsible, along with the customer, for back taxes due to Brazilian tax authorities

In Brazil, enterprise management systems are required to be structured so as not to allow for tax evasion. However, we cannot guarantee that our systems are not susceptible to security breaches that could enable tax evasion by a customer.

If such an event were to occur, Brazilian tax authorities could conclude that our software allows our customers to avoid compliance with their tax obligations and that we had acted in bad faith. Any such conclusion may require us to pay the unpaid taxes of our customers, plus interest and penalties, as well as subject us and our management to civil and criminal liabilities, depending on the magnitude of tax evasion committed by our customer, which could materially adversely affect our results.

The simplification of Brazilian tax rules would reduce the barriers to entry of international competitors

The complexities of Brazilian tax rules largely discourage entry of international competitors into the Brazilian retail market for the software industry, as a strong familiarization of the applicable tax laws of each state and of the Brazilian government is required to function in the sector. The Brazilian government has indicated that it may simplify the tax rules, which would remove an important entry barrier to our foreign competitors and could result in increased competition and materially adversely affect our financial results.

We may experience difficulties in expanding our products or in expanding into new lines of business, industries and/or foreign markets

We may face challenges in connection with the expansion of our products as well as our expansion into new lines of business, industries and/or new geographic regions within or outside of Brazil. In particular, as we expand into new lines of business, such as Linx Pay Hub, we may face challenges associated with entering into a line of business in which we have limited or no experience and in which we may not be well-known. Offering new products and services or offering existing products in new industries or new geographic regions may require substantial expenditures and takes considerable time, and we may not recover our investments in new markets in a timely manner or at all. For example, we may be unable to attract a sufficient number of merchants as customers, fail to anticipate competitive conditions or fail to adapt and tailor our services to different markets.

Currently, we have customers in markets other than Brazil (representing 5.6% of our net operating revenue as of December 31, 2018), and our long-term strategies include further expansion in these markets. We may experience the following difficulties related to the foreign markets in which we currently operate or will operate in the future, among others:

  • unanticipated regulatory changes;
  • an inability to attract staff and manage operations outside of Brazil;
  • changes in tax rules;
  • changes in the policies and regulations of trade and investment;
  • difficulties in the registration and protection of trademarks and software;
  • the adoption of protective measures, subsidies and other forms of government favoritism from competitors originating in such foreign markets; and
  • cultural and linguistic barriers.

Should one or more of these risks materialize, and we are not able to overcome these difficulties, we may be unable to implement our international expansion strategy.

A decline in the use of credit, debit or prepaid cards as a payment mechanism for consumers or adverse developments with respect to the payment processing industry in general could have a materially adverse effect on revenues which we expect to derive from our new line of business, Linx Pay Hub

If consumers do not continue to use credit, debit or prepaid cards as a payment mechanism for their transactions or if there is a change in the mix of payments between cash, credit, debit, prepaid cards and other accepted method of payments that is adverse to Linx Pay Hub, the revenue we expect to derive from Linx Pay Hub may be materially adversely affected. We believe future growth in the use of credit, debit and prepaid cards and other electronic payments will be driven by the cost, ease-of-use, and quality of services offered to consumers and businesses. In order to consistently increase and maintain our profitability, end-consumers and businesses must continue to use electronic payment methods including, credit, debit and prepaid cards. Moreover, if there is an adverse development in the payments industry or Brazilian market in general, such as new legislation or regulation that makes it more difficult for our merchants to do business or utilize such payment mechanisms, the revenue we expect to derive from Linx Pay Hub may be materially adversely affected.

Furthermore, we pay transaction fees to payment schemes, banks, acquiring payment institutions and other intermediaries that vary according to the method chosen by consumers to fund payment transactions. These transaction fees are higher when consumers fund payments using credit cards, and lower when consumers fund payments with debit cards. The financial success of Linx Pay Hub will be, therefore, sensitive to changes in the proportion of its business funded by consumers using credit and debit cards, which would increase its costs if we are unable to adjust the rates we charge our merchants accordingly.

Brazilian laws, CMN resolutions, circulars promulgated by the Central Bank, as well as future regulations and changes in tax rules affecting the payment industry in Brazil may materially adversely affect us in the event Linx Pay commences merchant acquisition operations

Due to the importance of the payment industry in Brazil, the Central Bank issued several new regulations in 2018 designed to increase the use of electronic payments, increase competitiveness in the sector, strengthen market governance, encourage supply and the differentiation of products for consumers as well as strengthen the use of credit and debit cards as a means of payment. Among the measures taken to effect these changes, the Central Bank issued the following noteworthy circulars:

  • Circular 3,885/2018, which provides that institutions having an annual turnover greater than R$500 million or at least R$50 million in payment accounts that accept exclusively accept electronic payments and which issue a post-paid payment instrument will be granted automatic authorization by the Central Bank;
  • Circular 3,886/2018, which defines and classifies “sub-creditors” and establishes a centralized settlement system for sub-creditors through the Brazilian Interbank Payments Chamber (Câmara Interbancária de Pagamentos); and
  • Circular 3,887/2018, which establishes maximum limits for exchange rates and the percentage remuneration for debit card issuers of 0.5% of the quarterly weighted average and 0.8% of the transaction value.

In addition to existing regulations, the Brazilian congress is currently considering several legislative initiatives that aim to modify the regulatory framework of the electronic payments sector, including changes in the period in which a card issuer makes payment to a commercial establishment and changes in the general rules of the Brazilian National Financial System (Sistema Financeiro Nacional). These initiatives are currently in varying stages of deliberation by the Brazilian congress and create significant uncertainty relating to the regulatory framework we may face in coming years. Brazilian laws, CVM resolutions, circulars or regulations resulting from such initiatives may materially adversely affect us.

We and our independent registered public accounting firm have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting and, if we fail to implement and maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting, we may be unable to accurately report our results of operations, meet our reporting obligations or prevent fraud

In connection with the audit of our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2018, we and our independent registered public accounting firm identified material weaknesses in our internal controls as noted below:

  • During our testing of the IT general controls, we identified material weaknesses related to managing access to our systems and controls and changes to the programs that manage such systems and controls, which were not designed or operating effectively;
  • We identified material weaknesses related to the recognition and measurement of revenues, which could result in an misstatement of our revenues if not timely identified by us; and
  • We identified several control deficiencies related to the accounting for accruals, leases, stock options, and amortization of intangible assets that were not identified during the process of preparing our financials and that, when considered in the aggregate, would be considered a material weakness.

If we are unable to properly maintain our internal controls, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results or prevent the occurrence of inappropriate or erroneous practices.

Under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, our management is not required to assess or report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting in our annual report on Form 20-F for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2019. We are only required to provide such a report for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2020. At that time, our management may conclude that our internal control over financial reporting is not effective. In addition, until we cease to be an “emerging growth company” as such term is defined in the JOBS Act, which may not be until after five full fiscal years following the date of this offering, our independent registered public accounting firm is not required to attest to and report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Even if our management concludes that our internal control over financial reporting is effective, our independent registered public accounting firm, after conducting its own independent testing, may disagree with our assessment or may issue a report that is qualified if it is not satisfied with our internal controls or the level at which our controls are documented, designed, operated or reviewed, or if it interprets the relevant requirements differently from us. In addition, after we become a public company in the United States, our reporting obligations may place a significant strain on our management, operational and financial resources and systems for the foreseeable future. We may be unable to timely complete our evaluation testing and any required remediation.

During the course of documenting and testing our internal control procedures, in order to satisfy the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, we may identify other weaknesses and deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting. In addition, if we fail to maintain the adequacy of our internal control over financial reporting, as these standards are modified, supplemented or amended from time to time, we may not be able to conclude on an ongoing basis that we have effective internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. If we fail to achieve and maintain an effective internal control environment, we could suffer material misstatements in our financial statements, fail to meet our reporting obligations or fail to prevent fraud, which would likely cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information. This could, in turn, limit our access to capital markets, harm our results of operations, and lead to a decline in the trading price of the ADSs. Additionally, ineffective internal control over financial reporting could expose us to increased risk of fraud or misuse of corporate assets and subject us to potential delisting from the NYSE, regulatory investigations and civil or criminal sanctions.

In the event that Linx Pay commences merchant acquisition operations, it may be subject to losses arising from such operations due to the possibility that credit card issuers default on their obligations to merchant acquirers

While we are currently not a merchant acquirer, we intend to expand our Linx Pay operations into this area in the future. As a merchant acquirer, Linx Pay would be subject to the risk that credit card issuers may default on their obligation to pay Linx Pay the amounts required to complete a cardholder’s transaction and process the corresponding payment to the applicable merchant. Merchant acquirers are also subject to the risk that cardholders may default on their obligations to credit card issuers.

The extent to which Linx Pay, upon commencing merchant acquirer operations, becomes subject to these risks is dependent on the risk/guarantee model that the credit card brand adopts for credit card issuers and credit card holders. Each credit card brand has developed its own model for guarantees that are detailed in its regulations.

Linx Pay may also be exposed to the risk that affiliated sub-merchant acquirers may not pass on the amounts received from us under credit card transactions to their affiliated establishments.

The realization of any of these risks may materially adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.

In the event that Linx Pay commences merchant acquisition operations, our operational results may be adversely affected by fraudulent transactions committed by third parties that are processed by us.

In the event that Linx Pay becomes a merchant acquirer, we will be exposed to the risk of fraudulent transactions carried out by third parties using our credit and debit cards. Failure to effectively manage such risk and prevent fraud may increase our chargeback liability as well as other liabilities and materially adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.

Our customers are charged for the use of certain of our products based on a percentage of the amount they bill to their clients, which may result in seasonal fluctuations that impact our quarterly results of operations.

In recent years, we have experienced seasonal fluctuations in our revenues from the retail sector as a result of consumer spending patterns. Most of our revenues are not tied to the percentage of the amount our customers bill to their clients. Following the launch of our OMS and Linx Pay e-commerce platform, however, we have increased the number of products in our portfolio that generate revenue based on the amount our customers bill their clients. Historically, sales have been stronger during the last quarter of the year as a result of the holiday season in Brazil. This is due to the increase in the number and transaction volumes of digital transactions and electronic payments related to seasonal retail events. With the increase in the aforementioned products as a percentage of our revenue, adverse events that occur during these months may have a disproportionate effect on our results of operations throughout the fiscal year. As a result of quarterly fluctuations caused by these and other factors, comparisons of our results of operations between different fiscal quarters may not be indicative our future performance.

Significant and increasing competition within the payment industry may materially adversely affect us

Linx Pay may face competitive pressure on the fees it charges its clients. Linx Pay’s competitors have already achieved a significant share of the markets in which Linx Pay operates. As a result, these competitors, particularly those that have relationships with financial institutions, can reduce their fees, offering rates that are more favorable to their current and potential clients, thereby impeding our growth in the market. If as a result of competition, Linx Pay is forced to reduce its fees, we may need to intensify our cost control efforts in order to maintain and expand our market share. An intensification of competition may cause us to lose current customers and may make it difficult for us to attract new customers, which may materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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